Under Advisement: Ohio Supreme Court Cases On Demand

Under Advisement is an engaging new program created by the Supreme Court of Ohio in an effort to reach high school students across Ohio and strengthen their understanding of Ohio’s court system. Over three or four class sessions, teachers will lead students through an in-depth study of an already-decided Ohio Supreme Court case utilizing original materials, including video recordings of Supreme Court oral arguments and written documents on the Supreme Court’s online case docket. Case previews and decision summaries written to high school Lexile reading levels are also included in the educator and student resource guides.

The lessons are free and were designed to align with Ohio’s Learning Standards for the High School American Government Curriculum (adopted 2018). To provide a real-world connection to the legal profession and courtroom, the Court encourages teachers to contact a local judge or attorney to help teach some or all of the sessions. Information on contacting an attorney is included in the Educator Resource Guide.

Civil Case

County of Wayne et. al. v. Ricky Baker, administrator, Case no. 2014-2079

A teenage driver, 17-year-old Kelli Baker, was involved in a fatal car crash while driving on a county road that was repaved days prior to her accident. Baker’s family filed a lawsuit claiming that Wayne County was negligent in its repair of the road, which led to her death. The Ohio Supreme Court is asked to decide if the county has immunity based on a state law that protects political subdivisions from such lawsuits.

Educators should email UnderAdvisementResources@sc.ohio.gov with their name and school/organization to request access to the Educator Resource Guide.*
Criminal Case

City of Cleveland v. Benjamin S. Oles, Case nos. 2016-0172 and 2016-0282

Benjamin Oles was placed in the front seat of a cruiser after being pulled over by an Ohio State Highway Patrol trooper. While seated in the cruiser’s front seat, Oles admitted to consuming four alcoholic drinks at a wedding he had just left. The trooper arrested Oles after he failed a field sobriety test. However, at no point was Oles read his Miranda rights. The Ohio Supreme Court is asked to decide whether a law enforcement officer is required to provide Miranda warnings to a suspect removed from a vehicle and placed in the front seat of a police vehicle for questioning.

Educators should email UnderAdvisementResources@sc.ohio.gov with their name and school/organization to request access to the Educator Resource Guide.*

* If you do not receive an email response within one hour, please call the Civic Education Office at 614.387.9223 during weekday business hours.